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The recent lesson that Vanessa did on My Immortal reminded me of a video I shot about four years ago with a couple of my teenage students. I had not really had much contact with either of them for a few years until Ryan came by for a visit recently. One of the things we talked about was the time when he and Paris collaborated on this beautiful piece.

I got back in touch with Paris and both kids (well, now young adults) agreed they would like to see the video again and posting it here at TG was fine. I believe they were in ninth grade when we shot this and they are both done with high school now.


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God Only Knows – The Beach Boys

by admin on July 16, 2015

Online Guitar Lessons from Totally Guitars

In early 1965 Brian Wilson stopped touring with the Beach Boys in order to concentrate on writing and recording. The first album from this next phase was Pet Sounds, an album not well received immediately by the public but now considered a historic masterpiece.

God Only Knows is a beautiful collaboration from Brian Wilson and Tony Asher that combined unusual chord inversions and tonal centers (what key was that?), with a tear-jerking vocal from Carl Wilson. This arrangement tries to bring as much as possible of the original parts into a coherent solo guitar piece. It always comes out a little different but here is how it went in July, 2015.


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Cavatina by Stanley Myers

by admin on April 15, 2015

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One of the most recognized classical guitar pieces of the last 50 years, Cavatina started out as a short piano piece by English composer Stanley Myers. In 1970 John Williams encouraged Stanley to stretch it out and they put together an orchestra version with two guitars. It was first recorded for Williams’ 1971 album, Changes, and was used as a theme in the movie The Walking Stick in 1970. The movie The Deer Hunter then used the song as its main theme in 1978, launching the piece into the mainstream. Almost every classical guitar player since then has worked on playing the solo version, mostly as arranged and performed by John Williams.

After unexplainedly neglecting this beautiful piece for all these years, I finally figured I should put together a lesson on it for Totally Guitars. With some assistance and advice from my old friend John Dimick, I took most of John Williams’ fingerings and changed or modified a few for various reasons that I go into in the lesson.

Here is what I really consider a rough draft of Cavatina as I am still exploring fingering options and overall tone and continuity. I have a feeling this will always somewhat be a work in progress, or maybe a work in evolution.

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Venezuelan Waltz #4 – Yacambu by Antonio Lauro

by admin on February 16, 2015

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Completing this series of Waltzes by Antonio Lauro, we have the last of the four. This one is more dissonant and dynamic than the other three, and not as commonly played or heard. I tend to take this slower than most of the versions I have heard as it is easy to lose the beauty and spirit of the melodies when played quickly.

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Continuing our series of classical pieces played on the steel-string guitar, we have the third Venezuelan Waltz by Antonio Lauro. This one is also known as Natalia and is probably the most recorded and well-known.

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For many months I have really been enjoying working on some beautiful pieces, mostly ragtime and classical. I recently had a chance to make some slightly more formal recordings of these favorites.

Here is Antonio Lauro’s Venezuelan Waltz #2, Andreina, a short but fascinating piece.

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Ragtime has always fascinated me,or at least since I first heard my grandmother play Maple Leaf Rag in the 1960s, and with the revival of the 1970s I started working on guitar arrangements of some Scott Joplin tunes. Most of what was out there were pretty heavily modified from the piano original to make them somewhat accessible on the guitar. As I started doing more of my own I could see why. They usually had parts that, while they may have been difficult on the piano, were downright impossible on the guitar. Or so I thought for many years.

Recently some questions came up on our Forum at TotallyGuitars about working through things that seem impossible, that sent me back to take another look at some things I had found particularly challenging. Heliotrope Bouquet was one that had quite a few parts that I was not happy with what seemed like the only possible way on the guitar. I decided to tackle rearranging the whole thing with the goal being to really capture everything I heard coming out of the piano version.

I then set to working on some very difficult parts, hoping I could get a handle on them with enough perseverance and practice. About 2 months ago I posted a Work-In-Progress video of where this was at the time and here is what it sounds like now.

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Online Guitar Lessons from Totally Guitars

This fascinating Prelude by Bach has captivated me since I was playing some of his music on the baroque lute, back in the 1970s. My lute playing days are probably over, having pretty much settled into playing the acoustic guitar with nails, but every once-in-awhile I like to revisit this piece.

The arrangements I found always left something to be desired as far as I was concerned, with a few measures seeming inconsistent with some of the rest. Many used hammer-ons in a few measures near the end that particularly seemed out of place. Most of those concessions made the piece a little easier to play but didn’t get the sound I remember from my old Walter Gerwig recording. I reworked those, along with a few earlier ones that had many possibly ways of fingering, and finally came up with an arrangement I am happy with.

I would guess that most of these have been found by other guitarists in the past but I usually like to take it upon my self to arrange, or rearrange things in the interest of being as true to the original as possible. This frequently makes the piece very difficult to play, but in this case I think I found a solution to the hammer-on problem that is easier, as well as musically more consistent.


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And Winter Glows – Neil Hogan

by admin on January 6, 2015

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Last week I put out a Work-In-Progress of this piece that appeared just before New Year’s Eve 2014, and I figured it was time to update it a bit, with a little more of the story.

It was a very cold night on December 30, 2014, well cold for Northern California, and I sat down with my guitar and a starting visualizing warmth and family, maybe sitting around the fire enjoying each other’s company. The guitar started playing this soft, gentle melody and wouldn’t stop. In less than an hour I had outlines for two sections. Very early the next morning I revisited and refined them a little, and it was done. I polished it up a bit over the next few days, mostly working on transitions between the sections, and this is what it sounds like now. One of my students suggested I should even call it Norman Rockwell but the title pretty much came along with the song as well.

I also thought it might be nice to experiment with multiple cameras as that is something I generally don’t take the time to do in most video lessons. In any case, I hope you like it.

Happy Holidays!


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My recent obsession with revisiting the world of Ragtime Guitar has had me playing almost nothing else for the past three or four weeks, much to the chagrin of my family. One of the pieces in heavy rotation is Heliotrope Bouquet, a hauntingly beautiful collaboration between Louis Chauvin and Scott Joplin.

There are many arrangements of this out there and most of them heavily modify the original as many passages do not translate easily to the guitar. I have tried to stick as faithfully as possible to the picture painted by the original, creating some very difficult sections.

I thought I would fire up the camera this morning as I was practicing and do a little Work In Progress video with some thoughts and comments on practicing challenging pieces. Much of this should be applicable to improving anything at any level and I hope to check back in in a few weeks with a more polished version. In the interest of full disclosure, most members of the household have been caught humming parts of this memorable melody.

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